Documentaries

User avatar
harris
Regular!
Posts: 1262
Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2004 5:39 pm
Location: Lake Charles, LA

Documentaries

Post by harris » Sat Jan 14, 2006 8:57 am

I'm kinda in the documentary mood. Are there any suggestion? Not limiting to, but I like seeing stuff like Capturing the Friedmanns and Dark Days and Paradise Lost, but it doesn't have to be off-color.

Bastard Wisher
Regular!
Posts: 1769
Joined: Mon Mar 29, 2004 6:31 am
Location: hawaii
Contact:

Post by Bastard Wisher » Sat Jan 14, 2006 9:17 am

Children Underground is good.
"One day the lizard woke up and realized that it was all alone on this earth."

User avatar
Kingfish
Regular!
Posts: 1252
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2005 9:14 am
Location: NYC
Contact:

Post by Kingfish » Sat Jan 14, 2006 9:36 am

American Movie, Burden of Dreams, Errol Morris's early films
Image
"The best Bergman film I've seen is Offret, and the worst, Interiors. I like them both."

existes
Regular
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon May 09, 2005 1:25 pm
Contact:

Post by existes » Sat Jan 14, 2006 11:38 am

herzog's 'lessons of darkness'...i wish that mendes prick had seen this before making jake-jarhead

benoit
Regular!
Posts: 472
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 9:21 am
Contact:

Post by benoit » Sat Jan 14, 2006 11:47 am

i like all kinds, but for some reason i can think of these, more trivial ...


Image

Lift - Marc Isaacs

"For ten hours each day filmmaker Marc Issacs stands in the lift of a typical London tower block with his camera, filming those that come and go during the day. At first he is greeted with indifference or just plain ignored by all except a man who is rather jolly after a few drinks. However as he starts to become more of a fixture in the lifts, his blunt questions start to draw information out and gain the trust of some of the residents. Some bring him food every time they travel up or down, others ask him questions and several tell him personal stuff about themselves – whether deliberately or by accident."

Image

My Grandmother's House - Adan Aliaga

<a href="http://www.lacasademiabuela.info/eng/vi ... _large.htm" target="_blank">trailer</a>

"My grandmother's house looks into the peculiar relationship between Marina, an impulsive and irreverent 6-year old girl, and Marita, her 75-year old grandmother. The old-fashioned upbringing imposed by the grandmother leads the girl to rebellion, not only against her but against everyone else. The life and customs of the family evolve over the years, uncovering emotions and conflicts."

Image

Spellbound - Jeffrey Blitz

<a href="http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZSt ... /index.xml" target="_blank">trailer</a>

"Every spring since 1925, Scripps Howard newspapers sponsor spelling bees at grade schools across the U.S. Ten million kids competed in 1999. This documentary follows eight of them as they win regional bees and prepare for the national contest in D.C. They're from big cities, suburbs, and small towns. We watch them practice, we hear their views on study, competition, victory and defeat. We meet their families: two have single parents, three are children of immigrants. Once in D.C., we watch them compete and listen to their parents between rounds. Each is engaging, all are talented, and one might win it all. In America, says one immigrant dad, hard work brings success."

Uter
Regular!
Posts: 1149
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2004 9:08 pm
Contact:

Post by Uter » Sat Jan 14, 2006 3:08 pm

Uh, Frederick Wiseman.

User avatar
harris
Regular!
Posts: 1262
Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2004 5:39 pm
Location: Lake Charles, LA

Post by harris » Sat Jan 14, 2006 5:27 pm

ive seen most of these but will def. check out children underground and my grandmothers house. thanks

namewithnohorse
Regular!
Posts: 127
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 11:58 am
Location: Manchester, UK

Post by namewithnohorse » Sat Jan 14, 2006 6:59 pm

Checkout Bodysong if you haven't already.
No words, just images.Sometimes harsh and very fucking beautiful.

<a href="http://www.britfilms.com/britishfilms/c ... kMpKCEEA5C" target="_blank">http://www.britfilms.com/britishfilms/c ... KCEEA5C</a>


User avatar
RONSAUCE
Regular!
Posts: 1169
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2005 9:29 pm
Location: Toronto

Post by RONSAUCE » Sat Jan 14, 2006 10:09 pm

Wow, I didn't know there was a Lightning Bolt documentary. I just ordered a copy of it.

Do you have possession of the Sally Mann one and the Helmut Newton one? Where can I find them?

User avatar
Kingfish
Regular!
Posts: 1252
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2005 9:14 am
Location: NYC
Contact:

Post by Kingfish » Sat Jan 14, 2006 10:37 pm

This is fucking hilarious: Chuck Dodson, wrote a review of the film Chicken Hawk: Men Who Love Boys, on IMDB. He's one of the child molesters in this movie (doesn't he realize that he's listed in the credits?)!
I felt that the underlying treatment of this documentary was generally hostile to a fair understanding of men who love boys and the message we have for society.

There were many "cheap shots" which I saw Adi taking in his film. Incidentally, not towards both sides, equally, but only towards boy lovers. There were technical maneuvers, such as making close-ups on people's teeth, or looking up at Leyland while he drove-and panning on old, dead trees they passed. And the music that was used-stuff that added to an emotion of we boy lovers not being all there, and even pathological.

Now, if Adi had made such a film about black men who loved white women in the 1920s, people would see what I'm talking about. You'd have a movie of "pure" interviews and images from that time. There would be no attempt at analysis. The result would be a film in which there would be a huge uproar in society about the way in which no one attempted to humanize the black men adequately. Adi's career might be ruined before it even started. And you can bet that he would not even begin to allow himself to make an oversight like that.

To conclude, i say that "CHICKEN HAWK: Men Who Love Boys" as a film is in the grey area between a constructive communication to the public, and a destructive one. For the media literate it should hold intriguing questions that can be thought about at length before coming to tentative conclusions. For the media illiterate, the film will most certainly be just one more reason to enhance and enable the increasing psychiatrick-industrial complex. They won't desire to look at we "perverts" as individuals, nor wonder how the film-maker got so close to such people who are supposedly forever "beyond the reach" of "ill-equipped" and "weak budgeted" law enforcement agencies. They'll just foam at the mouth and want to KILL KILL KILL like good citizens are supposed to do at the whim of imposed authority.
Image
"The best Bergman film I've seen is Offret, and the worst, Interiors. I like them both."

benoit
Regular!
Posts: 472
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 9:21 am
Contact:

Post by benoit » Sat Jan 14, 2006 10:38 pm

I don't think anybody mentioned the Maysles brothers yet...

ImageImageImage

SALESMAN

"A landmark American documentary, Salesman captures in vivid detail the bygone era of the door-to-door salesman. While laboring to sell a gold-embossed version of the Good Book, Paul Brennan and his colleagues target the beleaguered masses—then face the demands of quotas and the frustrations of life on the road. Following Brennan on his daily rounds, the Maysles discover a real-life Willy Loman, walking the line from hype to despair."

GREY GARDENS

"Meet Big and Little Edie Beale—high society dropouts, mother and daughter, reclusive cousins of Jackie O.—thriving together amid the decay and disorder of their ramshackle East Hampton mansion. Five years after Gimme Shelter, the Maysles unveiled this impossibly intimate portrait of the unexpected, an eerie echo of the Kennedy Camelot, which has since become a cult classic and established Little Edie as fashion icon and philosopher queen."

GIMME SHELTER

"Called “the greatest rock film ever made,” this landmark documentary follows the Rolling Stones on their notorious 1969 U.S. tour. When 300,000 members of the Love Generation collided with a few dozen Hell’s Angels at San Francisco’s Altamont Speedway, direct cinema pioneers David and Albert Maysles and Charlotte Zwerin immortalized on film the bloody slash that transformed a decade's dreams into disillusionment."

benoit
Regular!
Posts: 472
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 9:21 am
Contact:

Post by benoit » Sat Jan 14, 2006 10:43 pm

and here's some free advice from Albert Maysles about documentary and cinéma vérité...

<a href="http://maysles.web.aplus.net/company_pa ... tions.html" target="_blank">website</a>


THE DOCUMENTARY

by ALBERT MAYSLES

WHY

As a documentarian I happily place my fate and faith in reality. It is my caretaker, the provider of subjects, themes, experiences—all endowed with the power of truth and the romance of discovery. And the closer I adhere to reality the more honest and authentic my tales. After all, knowledge of the real world is exactly what we need to better understand and therefore possibly to love one another. It’s my way of making the world a better place.

HOW

1. Distance oneself from a point of view.
2. Love your subjects.
3. Film events, scenes, sequences; avoid interviews, narration, host.
4. Work with the best talent.
5. Make it experiential, film experience directly, unstaged, uncontrolled.
6. There is a connection between reality and truth. Remain faithful to both

SOME DO’S AND DON'TS

* Hold it steady.
* Use manual zoom, not the electronic.
* Read as much of the PD 170 manual as you can.
* Read book or chapter in a photography book on how to compose shots.
* Use the steady device that’s in the camera.
* Never use a tripod (exception: filming photographs, for example).
* You’ll get a steadier picture the more wide-angle the shot. In a walking shot go very wide angle.
* Hold the beginning and end of each shot. The editor will need that.
* Use no lights. The available light is more authentic.
* Learn the technique but equally important keep your eye open to watch the significant moment. Orson Welles: “The cameraman’s camera should have behind its lens the eye of a poet.”
* Remember, as a documentarian you are an observer, an author but not a director, a discoverer, not a controller.
* Don’t worry that your presence with the camera will change things. Not if you’re confident you belong there and understand that in your favor is that of the two instincts, to disclose or to keep a secret, the stronger is to disclose.
* It’s not “fly-on-the-wall”. That would be mindless. You need to establish rapport even without saying so but through eye contact and empathy.

Uter
Regular!
Posts: 1149
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2004 9:08 pm
Contact:

Post by Uter » Sat Jan 14, 2006 11:56 pm

I second Streetwise and Baraka. I saw a documentary on Sally Mann on PBS or something. It was pretty cool. I think it was with a program called Art 21 or something. They get 21 artists and do a little special on them and just have the artist talk about stuff. The concept sounds really cool but it's actually quite uneven. I saw another film like that dealing with independent music called Looking for a Thrill. They interview musicians and just have them tell a story. Again, it sounded really cool but a lot of the stories were boring. They interviewed Steve Albini, Bjork, and members from Slint, Tortoise, Sonic Youth, etc.

<a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0448234/" target="_blank">http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0448234/</a>

I always thought it would be cool if they did one on independent filmmakers and actually pulled it off.

User avatar
RONSAUCE
Regular!
Posts: 1169
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2005 9:29 pm
Location: Toronto

Post by RONSAUCE » Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:29 am

<!--QuoteBegin-Uter+--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Uter)</div><div class='quotemain'><!--QuoteEBegin-->I second Streetwise and Baraka. I saw a documentary on Sally Mann on PBS or something. It was pretty cool. I think it was with a program called Art 21 or something. They get 21 artists and do a little special on them and just have the artist talk about stuff. The concept sounds really cool but it's actually quite uneven. I saw another film like that dealing with independent music called Looking for a Thrill. They interview musicians and just have them tell a story. Again, it sounded really cool but a lot of the stories were boring. They interviewed Steve Albini, Bjork, and members from Slint, Tortoise, Sonic Youth, etc.

<a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0448234/" target="_blank">http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0448234/</a>

I always thought it would be cool if they did one on independent filmmakers and actually pulled it off.<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

I own art: 21 on DVD. It can be bought through the PBS site. Matthew Barney, Bruce Neuman, Richard Serra and whole bunch of others are on it. It's good, but the segments are a little short. It would be great if it was more in depth.

Post Reply