John Waters' Top Ten of 2008

baal
Regular!
Posts: 1911
Joined: Sat Nov 13, 2004 2:05 pm
Location: australia

John Waters' Top Ten of 2008

Postby baal » Thu Dec 04, 2008 9:10 am

1 Sorry, it’s a tie: (A) Vicky Cristina Barcelona (Woody Allen) Does anybody not think this is the best American movie of the year (even though it was made in Spain)? Come on, it’s got a great script, the actors look like real movie stars, and Woody Allen films Scarlett Johansson with the same obsession Paul Morrissey had for Joe Dallesandro. Gives heterosexuality a good name! (B) Love Songs (Christophe Honoré) I may be the only person who would pick this as the best foreign-language movie of the year, but what do I care if you don’t like this hipper-than-thou bisexual French musical? When the sexy, smart-ass characters burst into songs about brain tumors, saliva, and human sandwiches, I get all teary inside and realize that this is the only romantic comedy I’ve ever really loved.

2 Mister Lonely (Harmony Korine) A Marilyn Monroe look-alike lures a Michael Jackson impersonator to an island that is sort of like a cinematic Jonestown without the suicide, except for nuns who jump out of a plane piloted by Werner Herzog. Korine’s most fully realized movie doesn’t copy anybody.

3 Savage Grace (Tom Kalin) Julianne Moore in the best Isabelle Huppert role of the year. When a bad mother with good clothes fucks her sexy son, we feel downright criminal in our celluloid enjoyment.

4 Man on Wire (James Marsh) To see Philippe Petit lie down on the tightrope strung between the World Trade Center buildings as the police attempt to arrest him is to experience the most joyous defiance of the law ever seen on film.

5 The Last Mistress (Catherine Breillat) A brilliant costume drama that gets down on its tripod to worship the amazingly pillowy lips of its male lead, Fu’ad Aït Aattou. The most seductively sexual on-screen storytelling since Salò.

6 My Winnipeg (Guy Maddin) I remain frozen in admiration of this homegrown masterpiece from the most reluctantly radical and humorously tortured maverick working in the movies today.

7 The Wrestler (Darren Aronofsky) The director may be channeling the Dardenne brothers, but Mickey Rourke eerily reminds me of Jean Marais bringing beauty to the Beast in Cocteau’s La Belle et la Bête. Just imagine Mickey’s Oscar speech!

8 Taxi to the Dark Side (Alex Gibney) Once you see this documentary about an Afghan cabbie who was at the wrong place at the wrong time in the US war on terror, you’ll feel like rioting in the streets. Go ahead. Turn over a car. It’s good for you.

9 Milk (Gus Van Sant) Sean Penn’s amazing performance as Harvey Milk will make everybody in America have a gay agenda. I also salute the director’s restraint in not showing Dan White eating Twinkies.

10 Cassandra’s Dream (Woody Allen) Colin Farrell’s best performance ever as a guilt-ridden murderer who lets his remorse eat him alive. And I’m certainly not sorry to tell you the critics were wrong on this one.

http://artforum.com/inprint/id=21496

User avatar
mylkhead
Regular!
Posts: 266
Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2005 6:24 pm
Location: Cleveland, OH
Contact:

Re: John Waters' Top Ten of 2008

Postby mylkhead » Mon Dec 08, 2008 6:44 am

Darren Aronofsky channeling the Dardenne brothers? In a wrestling movie? That's got me interested.

User avatar
RONSAUCE
Regular!
Posts: 1169
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2005 9:29 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: John Waters' Top Ten of 2008

Postby RONSAUCE » Mon Dec 08, 2008 1:05 pm

I 'm so sick of every critic saying that any director who uses natural light and handheld cameras is channeling the Dardenne brothers. It's fucking retarded. What about Von Trier or Loach or Lionel Rogosin or countless other directors?

User avatar
Brandon...
Regular!
Posts: 97
Joined: Fri Jul 04, 2008 3:13 am

Re: John Waters' Top Ten of 2008

Postby Brandon... » Tue Dec 09, 2008 3:50 am

The Last Mistress would be on my list too.

User avatar
mylkhead
Regular!
Posts: 266
Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2005 6:24 pm
Location: Cleveland, OH
Contact:

Re: John Waters' Top Ten of 2008

Postby mylkhead » Thu Dec 11, 2008 5:42 am

RONSAUCE wrote:I 'm so sick of every critic saying that any director who uses natural light and handheld cameras is channeling the Dardenne brothers. It's fucking retarded. What about Von Trier or Loach or Lionel Rogosin or countless other directors?


Loach or Rogosin, I am not familiar with them yet. What would be good films to start out with? How similiar are they to the Dardenne brothers?

User avatar
RONSAUCE
Regular!
Posts: 1169
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2005 9:29 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: John Waters' Top Ten of 2008

Postby RONSAUCE » Thu Dec 11, 2008 3:04 pm

If you watch Sweet Sixteen by Ken Loach it's quite similar stylistically to the Dardenne Brothers, so that might be a good one to watch. Also, the Dardenne's once said that Raining Stones by Ken Loach was one of their favorite films, so that could also be good. However, I think the best route would be to watch Bresson if you like the Dardenne Brothers work. If you like Rosetta watch Mouchette.

Rogosin was more of me being a smartass. That's a more obscure director but I think he was nominated for an oscar. He directed this film in the 1950's called On the Bowery. It was shot on skidrow uses non actor's and documentary like aesthetics. My point was basically that ever since it was possible to work that way people have, once those cameras were invented people started shooting that way because it makes sense. Critics always get so distracted by it but that's only because they waste most of their time watching Hollywood films. But it's not at all uncommon for independent film to be shot that way. Actually independent is the wrong word. It's is not that uncommon for a film to be shot way. It's not that uncommon for cinema to be shot that way. If you look around the world and the cinematic histories of different countries, their films have much more in common with the Dardenne Brother's than the average hollywood film. Basically since Italian neo-realism it's been a mainstay.

Sorry to go off on a rant like that, I know you are just looking for some good recommendations. A good place to start might be the Independent Spirit Awards. I think almost every film nominated this year has been compared to the Dardenne Brothers at one point.

http://www.spiritawards.com/nominees

but in particular:
Ballst, Wendy and Lucy, and Chop Shop

alfred chamberlain
Regular
Posts: 63
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2005 1:35 pm

Re: John Waters' Top Ten of 2008

Postby alfred chamberlain » Thu Dec 11, 2008 3:41 pm

mylkhead wrote:Loach or Rogosin, I am not familiar with them yet. What would be good films to start out with?


Poor Cow, Kes, and Riff-Raff are considered Loach's other major works. Hard to see in America, for those of us that don't download at least.

User avatar
mylkhead
Regular!
Posts: 266
Joined: Thu Nov 24, 2005 6:24 pm
Location: Cleveland, OH
Contact:

Re: John Waters' Top Ten of 2008

Postby mylkhead » Fri Dec 12, 2008 5:27 am

RONSAUCE wrote:If you watch Sweet Sixteen by Ken Loach it's quite similar stylistically to the Dardenne Brothers, so that might be a good one to watch. Also, the Dardenne's once said that Raining Stones by Ken Loach was one of their favorite films, so that could also be good. However, I think the best route would be to watch Bresson if you like the Dardenne Brothers work. If you like Rosetta watch Mouchette.

Rogosin was more of me being a smartass. That's a more obscure director but I think he was nominated for an oscar. He directed this film in the 1950's called On the Bowery. It was shot on skidrow uses non actor's and documentary like aesthetics. My point was basically that ever since it was possible to work that way people have, once those cameras were invented people started shooting that way because it makes sense. Critics always get so distracted by it but that's only because they waste most of their time watching Hollywood films. But it's not at all uncommon for independent film to be shot that way. Actually independent is the wrong word. It's is not that uncommon for a film to be shot way. It's not that uncommon for cinema to be shot that way. If you look around the world and the cinematic histories of different countries, their films have much more in common with the Dardenne Brother's than the average hollywood film. Basically since Italian neo-realism it's been a mainstay.

Sorry to go off on a rant like that, I know you are just looking for some good recommendations. A good place to start might be the Independent Spirit Awards. I think almost every film nominated this year has been compared to the Dardenne Brothers at one point.

http://www.spiritawards.com/nominees

but in particular:
Ballst, Wendy and Lucy, and Chop Shop


I saw Mouchette, and I liked it, but that was before I saw any Dardenne stuff I believe. I added L'Argent and Au Hasard Balthazar to my Netflix. What's this "wooden acting" I keep hearing about? Dardenne's characters were certainly never wooden, they're constantly moving. Not that it matters, just curious as to what you would have to say about it.

User avatar
RONSAUCE
Regular!
Posts: 1169
Joined: Sun Jun 26, 2005 9:29 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: John Waters' Top Ten of 2008

Postby RONSAUCE » Fri Dec 12, 2008 4:50 pm

do you mean wooden acting in Bresson's films? i can see that in some of his work. definetly in something like The Devil Probably. i heard that he would get his actors to say the lines again and again until they talked without thinking. maybe that's what "wooden acting" was referring too?

clearly the films are diffferent in many was but there's also a really cool connection, i think. I prefer those sort of connections over a trend that a critic has spotted. something like what The Passion of Joan of Arc is to Breaking the Waves or what Ordet is to Silent Light.

User avatar
Johnny Boy
Regular!
Posts: 836
Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 6:45 am

Re: John Waters' Top Ten of 2008

Postby Johnny Boy » Sat Dec 13, 2008 9:05 am

RONSAUCE wrote:do you mean wooden acting in Bresson's films? i can see that in some of his work. definetly in something like The Devil Probably. i heard that he would get his actors to say the lines again and again until they talked without thinking. maybe that's what "wooden acting" was referring too?

'Model acting' I think it's called, I don't really get it... it doesn't seem natural at all to me.


Return to “General Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests